CAREER

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Perspectives on CAREER
  • Automatically generated from scanning world media.
  • Curated by SolveCast podcasters and editors.
  • (Curated) Ben Relles is an American businessman currently serving as Head of Innovation at YouTube,...
  • (Curated) Steve Jobs was an American business magnate, industrial designer, investor, and media prop...
  • (Curated) Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama is an American attorney and author who served as the Fir...
  • (Curated) Sir James Paul McCartney CH MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer, songwriter, musi...
  • (Curated) Gordon Gekko is a composite character in the 1987 film Wall Street and its 2010 sequel Wal...
  • Director and Founder of the Biomimicry Design Alliance
  • Founder - EnerYields I WELL AP I PhD - Building Performance & Diagnostics
  • Founder at Via Lucent and Owner’s Representative at Minneapolis Public Schools
  • Consultant
  • Ted Lasso is an American sports comedy-drama streaming television series developed by Jason Sudeikis...
  • Human Resources Business Partner | Employee Engagement | Performance Management
  • Simone Arianne Biles is an American artistic gymnast. With a combined total of 32 Olympic and World...
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CAREER Posts
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  • Steve Jobs
    Again, you can't connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something, your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. Beleiveing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart Even when it leads you off the well worn path, and that will make all the difference. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UF8uR6Z6KLc
    2021-04-14
  • Laurie McGinley
    I knew I wanted to be an architect when I was in high school. So at seventeen I picked this route. And I think I was really close. That was probably the most accurate choice I could have made at that time about what I thought I wanted to be when I grew up. And at the time sustainability wasn't in the forefront of my mind that was circa 1995. And I grew up in a family that recycled pretty early and were conscious about the energy that we use, but it wasn't a major theme in picking the field. Certainly throughout undergrad, I became aware of it. But it wasn't until I decided to go back, I left the field for a bit and came back and it wasn't until I decided to go back that it was very much in the forefront of my mind. I became a web designer after my undergrad and decided to go back for my master of architecture in order to do something about climate. https://www.solvecast.com/articles/detail/29674-how-fear-of-change-inhibits-our-progress-toward-a-sustainable-future-with-laurie-mcginley
    2021-08-04
  • Hetal Parekh
    I am an architect. I practice as an architect for two years only to realize that in order to make a difference at grassroots level I would probably have to follow where the money is. I. Hmm, I did my master's in sustainable design and then a PhD in building performance in diagnostics from Carnegie Mellon university. https://www.solvecast.com/articles/detail/29208-how-to-find-opportunities-to-make-green-building-design-possible-and-affordable
    2021-07-26
  • SolveCasters
    "Contrary to popular belief, more income does not necessarily make people happier. The actual amount a person earns doesn't matter much in terms of happiness," Liao said. "People who can make both upward and downward comparisons - especially with others in the same gender and ethno-racial group - are in the best position as far as their subjective well-being." https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-04/uoia-scd041221.php
    2021-05-08
  • Ben Relles
    I started a direct marketing company right out of school and I did that for about 5 years and the first few years went really well and then we had a couple really tough years. I felt like I was a little bit outmatched in terms of going into a room and really being able to build a business the right way. I talked to a lot of people that I trusted and a lot of them said that I should consider going and getting an MBA. So I started looking at schools. I would say the biggest reason I ended up at Wharton was from one visit at the campus I set up ten meetings with different students, kind of got a sense of what they like about the school, whether they felt like the MBA was worth it, and after that visit was determined I am going to do everything I can to get in here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YrYZDXlyfZ4
    2021-04-15
  • Michelle Obama
    Particularly for minorities, there's this feeling like because you have been told you are not good enough. When you are in a room, you're wondering how did I get here, if I have been told I am not good enough. Women feel it often times. Cause society says you shouldn't be doing that. You feel like an imposter in your own life. Especially if you have achieved success. You're in rooms that you are not supposed to be in because society has told you that. You think, maybe is someone is going to discover that I shouldn't be here. All I can do is tell you this, imposter syndrome is a thing in your head. It's just like self-confidence, it's like any internal characteristic, much of it is what you practice telling yourself. And if you've heard that you're not good enough, that's what you are practicing. I am just here to tell you it is not true. You wouldn't be here, you wouldn't be doing what you are doing if you didn't belong here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dumm_XfHkmY
    2021-04-14
  • Steve Jobs
    Good engineers. Lousy management. And what happened was you look at the farm that's been created with all these different animals going in different directions and it doesn't add up the total is less than the sum of the parts. And so we had to decide what are the fundamental directions we're going in and what makes sense and what doesn't and there were a bunch of things that didn't and microcosmically they might have made sense macrocosmically they made no sense. And you know the hardest thing is... when you think about focusing right? You think, well focusing is is saying yes! No. Focusing... is about saying no. Focusing is about saying no. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8eP99neOVs
    2021-04-14
  • Ben Relles
    I feel like a lot of the classes I had, on what you might call the soft skills are the ones that are really valuable for me throughout the last 10 years. And I, you know, from the leadership fellow program to some of the classes on communication. I feel like when, when we took them, I wasn't aware of how relevant they would be moving forward. And so for me, a lot of the things that I utilize on a daily basis that I learned here, I feel like came from some of those classes around leadership and management of people and communication. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YrYZDXlyfZ4
    2021-04-15
  • Gordon Gecko
    ladies and gentlemen that greed for lack of a better word is good. greed is right greed work.s greed clarifies cuts through and captures the essence of evolutionary spirit greed in all of its forms greed for life for money for love knowledge has marked an upward surge of mankind https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVxYOQS6ggk
    2021-04-16
  • Steve Jobs
    I think building a company is really hard and and it requires it requires your greatest persuasive abilities to hire the best people you can and keep them keep them keep them at your company and keep them working you know doing the best work of their lives hopefully https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvhW8cp15tk
    2021-04-14
  • Paul McCartney
    But that was because I wasn't me. I was this guy in this other group, it was very freeing... it was truth, it worked. When George brought up Within You Without You, nobody was there going Oh, George we don't really want any Indian music on this album we are a rock and roll band. It was like, yeah, let's see what happens. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DoDldTHHPLE
    2021-04-15
  • SolveCasters
    First, you must accept that rejection comes with the process. It is rare for someone to avoid rejection when applying to jobs. Once you have accepted that you will be rejected, you can avoid the demotivation that comes with it. Just like playing basketball, you shoot 100 free throws, but only 60 will land. https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2021/07/09/how-to-deal-with-rejection-and-ghosting-while-looking-for-a-job/
    2021-07-25
  • Ben Relles
    I did a video called i got a crush on Obama and it was viewed something like 30 million times it was during the 2008 election where i like this idea of combining a pop song, comedy and this girl singing about Barack Obama when YouTube was really sort of early days. And i think what i also learned from that was if what you're looking for is press coverage and people talking about something there kind of needs to be there there and that's sort of the filter I put all my ideas through. If you heard this idea would you tell somebody else about it would this be something that you know you would talk about. http://www.solvecast.com/articles/detail/14828-how-to-motivate-people-to-take-social-action-on-social-media-with-ben-relles
    2021-04-14
  • Steve Jobs
    What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone, and it was devastating. I really didn't know what to do for a few months. I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs down - that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me. I met with David Packard and Bob Noyce and tried to apologize for screwing up so badly. I was a very public failure, and I even thought about running away from the valley. But something slowly began to dawn on me I still loved what I did. The turn of events at Apple had not changed that one bit. I had been rejected, but I was still in love. And so I decided to start over. I didn't see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter one of the most creative periods of my life. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UF8uR6Z6KLc
    2021-04-14
  • Gordon Gecko
    Capitalism at its finest how much is enough for the richest 1 percent of this country owns half our country's wealth five trillion dollars one-third of that comes from hard work 2/3 comes from an inheritance interest on interest accumulating widows idiot sons and what I do stock in real estate speculation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oDD1tW59Mjg
    2021-04-16
  • Simone Biles
    i've always said take take it one day at a time and i think that's helped me stay sane on all of those levels in and out of the gym because if i focus on one day at a time then i don't get too wrapped up in it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsQk9rpls38
    2021-09-28
  • Ted Lasso
    Most of the time change is a good thing, I think that’s what it’s all about, embracing change, being brave doing whatever you have to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9jI7id8c1Q
    2021-09-22
  • Laurie McGinley
    Pick up the tool that feels best in your hand and get to work. And I've said that twice now. I'm not a practicing architect right now. I have my license and I started a company because I realized that there is something that I individually with my unique abilities can do to advance the cause of addressing climate change much faster than I was doing that. https://www.solvecast.com/articles/detail/29674-how-fear-of-change-inhibits-our-progress-toward-a-sustainable-future-with-laurie-mcginley
    2021-08-04
  • Michelle Obama
    Do not be afraid to fail because that often times is the thing that keeps us as women and girls back because we think we have to be right and we think we have to be perfect we think that we can't stumble and the only way you succeed in life the only way you learn is by failing it's not the failure it's what you do after you fail https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vovsueLkZYg
    2021-09-22
  • Steve Jobs
    When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: "If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you'll most certainly be right." It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: "If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?" And whenever the answer has been "No" for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something. Remembering that I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure - these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UF8uR6Z6KLc
    2021-04-14
  • SolveCasters
    You have pro players missing layups. You have NFL players dropping passes. You have professional baseball players striking out some mistakes are gonna happen. But the one thing is I always use a thing called the one percent rule where you want to get better...So as long as you're getting better, 1% every single day, whether it's on your skillset, your mental over time... you're getting better 1% every day. By the time you get the high school college, you're going to be a great player because you always focused on, hey, I got to get 1% better, and I think that's key because what happens, what tends to happen a lot of times with kids, they either have pressure from their parents or whatever it is. It's they don't think about the big picture. They're just stuck going like the here and now. So you really see that growth. That 1% growth that you talk about. #1738 #parenting http://www.solvecast.com/articles/detail/15263-player-parent-and-coach-in-developing-mentally-strong-individuals-with-dawaun-wells-limitless-international-basketball
    2021-01-16
  • SolveCasters
    I loved my coworkers and I loved the projects I was working on. But it wasn't impactful enough, on a day-to-day basis, like who really needs another strawberry yogurt in this world. And so I ended up departing my cushy corporate job and going back to school for my MBA in social impact entrepreneurship, specifically in global food systems change. So really thinking about how do we advance the way we're going to feed people on this planet and how are we going to do so within our planetary boundaries, through 2050, and I'm super non traditional MBA. I'm not a banker, I'm not a consultant, not a part of any of the big evil empires. Although, there's some benefits to those too for those who follow that path. But it brought me down a very unique world. I was in the nutrition team at the Bill & Melinda Gates foundation and their private sector partnerships which is where I was introduced the first 1000 days of life. So I'm not a mom. I don't have any kids with myself. I've never breastfed, but I was introduced to this kind of unlocking potential that breastfeeding really has. http://www.solvecast.com/articles/detail/15379-technology-for-the-production-of-breast-milk-outside-the-body-with-michelle-eger-co-founder-ceo-at-biomilq
    2021-04-01
  • Steve Jobs
    I naively chose a college that was almost as expensive as Stanford, and all of my working-class parents' savings were being spent on my college tuition. After six months, I couldn't see the value in it. I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life and no idea how college was going to help me figure it out. And here I was spending all of the money my parents had saved their entire life. So I decided to drop out and trust that it would all work out OK. It was pretty scary at the time, but looking back it was one of the best decisions I ever made. The minute I dropped out I could stop taking the required classes that didn't interest me, and begin dropping in on the ones that looked interesting. It wasn't all romantic. I didn't have a dorm room, so I slept on the floor in friends' rooms, I returned coke bottles for the 5 cent deposits to buy food with, and I would walk the 7 miles across town every Sunday night to get one good meal a week at the Hare Krishna temple. I loved it. And much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition turned out to be priceless later on. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UF8uR6Z6KLc
    2021-04-14
  • SolveCasters
    i will say that one that i use pretty much every day which is interesting and unexpected to me is this class that's called path to power and it's all about actually understanding power dynamics and and generally leveraging that to accomplish an impact and i think for me the interesting part about that is just how do you understand power dynamics in in the workplace and just generally in life and and just use that to accomplish goals and those goals can be to have to accomplish a lot of social good which is personally which personally resonated with me https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfYI6kHH1NY
    2021-04-16
  • SolveCasters
    i think what is really amazing about stanford in particular if you want to be in tech and you want to be in the bay area stanford is an incredible network of people for you to get to know both in your class but also inter-class i have seen a number of my own classmates do this and i again have hired a number of people who didn't have a traditional tech background i think that stanford like it is not a guarantee but i think it very stanford in many ways greases the wheels to make that to make that transition a lot more seamless yeah and i would say the only thing to add is i generally advise people to take the almost think of it as like a step function and in general like maybe you don't have the functional expertise but you have the industry or vertical expertise or maybe vice versa but there's always something that you can add and it's just about finding out what can you add to those teams because similarly i've hired people who've had a variety of experiences but there's always something that they add that's missing from my team that's really impactful https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfYI6kHH1NY
    2021-04-16