Solving for Indoor Air Quality and Resilience with Alan Scott, Sustainability Connector and Architect

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Karrah Krakovyak
Sustainability Innovator
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Highlights from this article

We can look at fine tuning the controls so that we're increasing ventilation, increasing the thermal comfort for spaces where they're occupied and dialing that back when they're not occupied. So we have, we can use more sophisticated, and intelligent controls and buildings to provide the extra when we need it and dial back and save energy when we don't need the systems fully. 
 https://www.solvecast.com/articles/detail/38168-solving-for-indoor-air-quality-and-resilience-with-scott-alan-sustainability-connector-and-architect

Many of the schools that our kids go to today were designed decades ago with substandard ventilation. And now we're, we're seeing that in, in terms of impacts of poor air quality in schools and its impact both on, on the health of teachers and students and, and uh, increased COVID risks as well as in learning environments that we've learned that, that uh, CO2 concentrations, for example, can lead to lower cognitive function. 
 https://www.solvecast.com/articles/detail/38168-solving-for-indoor-air-quality-and-resilience-with-scott-alan-sustainability-connector-and-architect
  • By Alan Scott
  • 8 months ago
  • 1
  • Starts 1075 seconds

The impacts of climate change are already being felt. And we had to uh, massive heat waves and floods and hurricanes and wildfires over the summer. Lots of areas of the country were impacted by those things. And so we're already feeling. They have human safety as well as property damage issues. 
 https://www.solvecast.com/articles/detail/38168-solving-for-indoor-air-quality-and-resilience-with-scott-alan-sustainability-connector-and-architect

What is the most effective way that they. 
 Implement changes to, to improve indoor air quality and reduce uh, pathogen, transmission risks and people who occupy the buildings are wanting in that assurance. So, uh, one of the things that we've been doing is testing to show the comparative efficacy, efficacy of different strategies, building owners can implement to help them select the most cost-effective and efficacious, uh,, strategies. 
 to provide the invalidation testing to show uh, to the stakeholders that, that these strategies have been put in place are working. And so a key piece we came out of this is that uh, keeping it simple, it's sometimes best focusing on uh, ventilation effectiveness and, and high quality filtration uh, are as effective or more effective than in most other strategies that they might have. 
 https://www.solvecast.com/articles/detail/38168-solving-for-indoor-air-quality-and-resilience-with-scott-alan-sustainability-connector-and-architect
  • By Alan Scott
  • 8 months ago
  • 1
  • Starts 1074 seconds

The impacts of climate change are already being felt. And we had to uh, massive heat waves and floods and hurricanes and wildfires over the summer. Uh, Lots of areas of the country were impacted by those things. And so we're already feeling. Those, , impacts. And there, they have human safety as well as property damage issues. 
 They also are impacting human health with everything from wildfire smoke to uh, mold and mildew and structures that have been flooded or. Inundated with hurricanes. Uh, So as we think to, , uh, seek solutions to increase resilience and support health and wellness now in the face of these uh, you know, current hazard events that we're facing uh, we can, , be implementing solutions that, that are also reducing carbon emissions. 
 https://www.solvecast.com/articles/detail/38168-solving-for-indoor-air-quality-and-resilience-with-scott-alan-sustainability-connector-and-architect

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